Regulations last checked for updates: Sep 19, 2019

Title 36 - Parks, Forests, and Public Property last revised: Aug 28, 2019
§ 2.1 - Preservation of natural, cultural and archeological resources.

(a) Except as otherwise provided in this chapter, the following is prohibited:

(1) Possessing, destroying, injuring, defacing, removing, digging, or disturbing from its natural state:

(i) Living or dead wildlife or fish, or the parts or products thereof, such as antlers or nests.

(ii) Plants or the parts or products thereof.

(iii) Nonfossilized and fossilized paleontological specimens, cultural or archeological resources, or the parts thereof.

(iv) A mineral resource or cave formation or the parts thereof.

(2) Introducing wildlife, fish or plants, including their reproductive bodies, into a park area ecosystem.

(3) Tossing, throwing or rolling rocks or other items inside caves or caverns, into valleys, canyons, or caverns, down hillsides or mountainsides, or into thermal features.

(4) Using or possessing wood gathered from within the park area: Provided, however, That the superintendent may designate areas where dead wood on the ground may be collected for use as fuel for campfires within the park area.

(5) Walking on, climbing, entering, ascending, descending, or traversing an archeological or cultural resource, monument, or statue, except in designated areas and under conditions established by the superintendent.

(6) Possessing, destroying, injuring, defacing, removing, digging, or disturbing a structure or its furnishing or fixtures, or other cultural or archeological resources.

(7) Possessing or using a mineral or metal detector, magnetometer, side scan sonar, other metal detecting device, or subbottom profiler.

This paragraph does not apply to:

(i) A device broken down and stored or packed to prevent its use while in park areas.

(ii) Electronic equipment used primarily for the navigation and safe operation of boats and aircraft.

(iii) Mineral or metal detectors, magnetometers, or subbottom profilers used for authorized scientific, mining, or administrative activities.

(b) The superintendent may restrict hiking or pedestrian use to a designated trail or walkway system pursuant to §§ 1.5 and 1.7. Leaving a trail or walkway to shortcut between portions of the same trail or walkway, or to shortcut to an adjacent trail or walkway in violation of designated restrictions is prohibited.

(c)(1) The superintendent may designate certain fruits, berries, nuts, or unoccupied seashells which may be gathered by hand for personal use or consumption upon a written determination that the gathering or consumption will not adversely affect park wildlife, the reproductive potential of a plant species, or otherwise adversely affect park resources.

(2) The superintendent may:

(i) Limit the size and quantity of the natural products that may be gathered or possessed for this purpose; or

(ii) Limit the location where natural products may be gathered; or

(iii) Restrict the possession and consumption of natural products to the park area.

(3) The following are prohibited:

(i) Gathering or possessing undesignated natural products.

(ii) Gathering or possessing natural products in violation of the size or quantity limits designated by the superintendent.

(iii) Unauthorized removal of natural products from the park area.

(iv) Gathering natural products outside of designated areas.

(v) Sale or commercial use of natural products.

(d) This section shall not be construed as authorizing the taking, use, or possession of fish, wildlife, or plants for ceremonial or religious purposes, except for the gathering and removal of plants or plant parts by enrolled members of an Indian tribe in accordance with § 2.6, or where specifically authorized by federal statutory law, treaty, or in accordance with § 2.2 or § 2.3.

Note:

Regulations concerning archeological resources are found in 43 CFR part 3.

[48 FR 30282, June 30, 1983, as amended at 81 FR 45037, July 12, 2016]
§ 2.2 - Wildlife protection.

(a) The following are prohibited:

(1) The taking of wildlife, except by authorized hunting and trapping activities conducted in accordance with paragraph (b) of this section.

(2) The feeding, touching, teasing, frightening or intentional disturbing of wildlife nesting, breeding or other activities.

(3) Possessing unlawfully taken wildlife or portions thereof.

(b) Hunting and trapping. (1) Hunting shall be allowed in park areas where such activity is specifically mandated by Federal statutory law.

(2) Hunting may be allowed in park areas where such activity is specifically authorized as a discretionary activity under Federal statutory law if the superintendent determines that such activity is consistent with public safety and enjoyment, and sound resource management principles. Such hunting shall be allowed pursuant to special regulations.

(3) Trapping shall be allowed in park areas where such activity is specifically mandated by Federal statutory law.

(4) Where hunting or trapping or both are authorized, such activities shall be conducted in accordance with Federal law and the laws of the State within whose exterior boundaries a park area or a portion thereof is located. Nonconflicting State laws are adopted as a part of these regulations.

(c) Except in emergencies or in areas under the exclusive jurisdiction of the United States, the superintendent shall consult with appropriate State agencies before invoking the authority of § 1.5 for the purpose of restricting hunting and trapping or closing park areas to the taking of wildlife where such activities are mandated or authorized by Federal statutory law.

(d) The superintendent may establish conditions and procedures for transporting lawfully taken wildlife through the park area. Violation of these conditions and procedures is prohibited.

(e) The Superintendent may designate all or portions of a park area as closed to the viewing of wildlife with an artificial light. Use of an artificial light for purposes of viewing wildlife in closed areas is prohibited.

(f) Authorized persons may check hunting and trapping licenses and permits; inspect weapons, traps and hunting and trapping gear for compliance with equipment restrictions; and inspect wildlife that has been taken for compliance with species, size and other taking restrictions.

(g) The regulations contained in this section apply, regardless of land ownership, on all lands and waters within a park area that are under the legislative jurisdiction of the United States.

[48 FR 30282, June 30, 1983, as amended at 49 FR 18450, Apr. 30, 1984; 51 FR 33264, Sept. 19, 1986; 52 FR 35240, Sept. 18, 1987]
§ 2.3 - Fishing.

(a) Except in designated areas or as provided in this section, fishing shall be in accordance with the laws and regulations of the State within whose exterior boundaries a park area or portion thereof is located. Nonconflicting State laws are adopted as a part of these regulations.

(b) State fishing licenses are not required in Big Bend, Crater Lake, Denali, Glacier, Isle Royale (inland waters only), Mammoth Cave, Mount Rainer, Olympic and Yellowstone National Parks.

(c) Except in emergencies or in areas under the exclusive jurisdiction of the United States, the superintendent shall consult with appropriate State agencies before invoking the authority of § 1.5 for the purpose of restricting or closing park areas to the taking of fish.

(d) The following are prohibited:

(1) Fishing in fresh waters in any manner other than by hook and line, with the rod or line being closely attended.

(2) Possessing or using as bait for fishing in fresh waters, live or dead minnows or other bait fish, amphibians, nonpreserved fish eggs or fish roe, except in designated waters. Waters which may be so designated shall be limited to those where non-native species are already established, scientific data indicate that the introduction of additional numbers or types of non-native species would not impact populations of native species adversely, and park management plans do not call for elimination of non-native species.

(3) Chumming or placing preserved or fresh fish eggs, fish roe, food, fish parts, chemicals, or other foreign substances in fresh waters for the purpose of feeding or attracting fish in order that they may be taken.

(4) Commercial fishing, except where specifically authorized by Federal statutory law.

(5) Fishing by the use of drugs, poisons, explosives, or electricity.

(6) Digging for bait, except in privately owned lands.

(7) Failing to return carefully and immediately to the water from which it was taken a fish that does not meet size or species restrictions or that the person chooses not to keep. Fish so released shall not be included in the catch or possession limit: Provided, That at the time of catching the person did not possess the legal limit of fish.

(8) Fishing from motor road bridges, from or within 200 feet of a public raft or float designated for water sports, or within the limits of locations designated as swimming beaches, surfing areas, or public boat docks, except in designated areas.

(e) Except as otherwise designated, fishing with a net, spear, or weapon in the salt waters of park areas shall be in accordance with State law.

(f) Authorized persons may check fishing licenses and permits; inspect creels, tackle and fishing gear for compliance with equipment restrictions; and inspect fish that have been taken for compliance with species, size and other taking restrictions.

(g) The regulations contained in this section apply, regardless of land ownership, on all lands and waters within a park area that are under the legislative jurisdiction of the United States.

[48 FR 30282, June 30, 1983, as amended at 52 FR 35240, Sept. 18, 1987]
§ 2.4 - Weapons, traps and nets.

(a) None of the provisions in this section or any regulation in this chapter may be enforced to prohibit an individual from possessing a firearm, including an assembled or functional firearm, in any National Park System unit if:

(1) The individual is not otherwise prohibited by law from possessing the firearm; and

(2) The possession of the firearm is in compliance with the law of the State in which the National Park System unit is located.

(b)(1) Except as otherwise provided in this section and parts 7 (special regulations) and 13 (Alaska regulations), the following are prohibited:

(i) Possessing a weapon, trap or net

(ii) Carrying a weapon, trap or net

(iii) Using a weapon, trap or net

(2) Weapons, traps or nets may be carried, possessed or used:

(i) At designated times and locations in park areas where:

(A) The taking of wildlife is authorized by law in accordance with § 2.2 of this chapter;

(B) The taking of fish is authorized by law in accordance with § 2.3 of this part.

(ii) When used for target practice at designated times and at facilities or locations designed and constructed specifically for this purpose and designated pursuant to special regulations.

(iii) Within a residential dwelling. For purposes of this subparagraph only, the term “residential dwelling” means a fixed housing structure which is either the principal residence of its occupants, or is occupied on a regular and recurring basis by its occupants as an alternate residence or vacation home.

(3)(i) Traps, nets and unloaded weapons may be possessed within a temporary lodging or mechanical mode of conveyance when such implements are rendered temporarily inoperable or are packed, cased or stored in a manner that will prevent their ready use.

(ii) An individual may carry or possess an unloaded bow or crossbow when accessing otherwise inaccessible lands or waters contiguous to a park area when other means of access are otherwise impracticable or impossible if:

(A) The individual is not otherwise prohibited by law from possessing the bow or crossbow; and

(B) The possession of the bow or crossbow is in compliance with the law of the State in which the park area is located.

(c) Carrying or possessing a loaded weapon in a motor vehicle, vessel or other mode of transportation is prohibited, except that carrying or possessing a loaded weapon in a vessel is allowed when such vessel is not being propelled by machinery and is used as a shooting platform in accordance with Federal and State law.

(d) The use of a weapon, trap or net in a manner that endangers persons or property is prohibited.

(e) The superintendent may issue a permit to carry or possess a weapon that is not otherwise authorized, a trap, or a net under the following circumstances:

(1) When necessary to support research activities conducted in accordance with § 2.5.

(2) To carry firearms for persons in charge of pack trains or saddle horses for emergency use.

(3) For employees, agents or cooperating officials in the performance of their official duties.

(4) To provide access to otherwise inaccessible lands or waters contiguous to a park area when other means of access are otherwise impracticable or impossible.

Violation of the terms and conditions of a permit issued pursuant to this paragraph is prohibited and may result in the suspension or revocation of the permit.

(f) Authorized Federal, State and local law enforcement officers may carry firearms in the performance of their official duties.

(g) The carrying or possessing of a weapon, trap or net in violation of applicable Federal and State laws is prohibited.

(h) The regulations contained in this section apply, regardless of land ownership, on all lands and waters within a park area that are under the legislative jurisdiction of the United States.

[48 FR 30282, June 30, 1983, as amended at 49 FR 18450, Apr. 30, 1984; 52 FR 35240, Sept. 18, 1987; 73 FR 74971, Dec. 10, 2008; 80 FR 36476, June 25, 2015; 83 FR 47073, Sept. 18, 2018]
§ 2.5 - Research specimens.

(a) Taking plants, fish, wildlife, rocks or minerals except in accordance with other regulations of this chapter or pursuant to the terms and conditions of a specimen collection permit, is prohibited.

(b) A specimen collection permit may be issued only to an official representative of a reputable scientific or educational institution or a State or Federal agency for the purpose of research, baseline inventories, monitoring, impact analysis, group study, or museum display when the superintendent determines that the collection is necessary to the stated scientific or resource management goals of the institution or agency and that all applicable Federal and State permits have been acquired, and that the intended use of the specimens and their final disposal is in accordance with applicable law and Federal administrative policies. A permit shall not be issued if removal of the specimen would result in damage to other natural or cultural resources, affect adversely environmental or scenic values, or if the specimen is readily available outside of the park area.

(c) A permit to take an endangered or threatened species listed pursuant to the Endangered Species Act, or similarly identified by the States, shall not be issued unless the species cannot be obtained outside of the park area and the primary purpose of the collection is to enhance the protection or management of the species.

(d) In park areas where the enabling legislation authorizes the killing of wildlife, a permit which authorizes the killing of plants, fish or wildlife may be issued only when the superintendent approves a written research proposal and determines that the collection will benefit science or has the potential for improving the management and protection of park resources.

(e) In park areas where enabling legislation does not expressly prohibit the killing of wildlife, a permit authorizing the killing of plants, fish or wildlife may be issued only when the superintendent approves a written research proposal and determines that the collection will not result in the derogation of the values or purposes for which the park area was established and has the potential for conserving and perpetuating the species subject to collection.

(f) In park areas where the enabling legislation prohibits the killing of wildlife, issuance of a collecting permit for wildlife or fish or plants, is prohibited.

(g) Specimen collection permits shall contain the following conditions:

(1) Specimens placed in displays or collections will bear official National Park Service museum labels and their catalog numbers will be registered in the National Park Service National Catalog.

(2) Specimens and data derived from consumed specimens will be made available to the public and reports and publications resulting from a research specimen collection permit shall be filed with the superintendent.

(h) Violation of the terms and conditions of a permit issued in accordance with this section is prohibited and may result in the suspension or revocation of the permit.

Note:

The Secretary's regulations on the preservation, use, and management of fish and wildlife are found in 43 CFR part 24. Regulations concerning archeological resources are found in 43 CFR part 3.

§ 2.6 - Gathering of plants or plant parts by federally recognized Indian tribes.

(a) What terms do I need to know? The following definitions apply only to this section.

Indian tribe means an American Indian or Alaska Native tribe, band, nation, pueblo, village, or community that the Secretary of the Interior acknowledges to exist as an Indian tribe under the Federally Recognized Tribe List Act of 1994, 25 U.S.C. 479a.

Plants or plant parts means vascular plants or parts of vascular plants. No other types of plants may be gathered or removed under this section.

Traditional association means a longstanding relationship of historical or cultural significance between an Indian tribe and a park area predating the establishment of the park area.

Traditional gathering means the method of gathering plants or plant parts by hand or hand tools only. Traditional gathering does not include the use of tools or machinery powered by electricity, fossil fuels, or any other source of power except human power.

Traditional purpose means a customary activity or practice that is rooted in the history of an Indian tribe and is important to the continuation of that tribe's distinct culture.

Tribal official means an elected or duly appointed official of the federally recognized government of an Indian tribe authorized to act on behalf of the tribe with respect to the subject matter of this regulation.

(b) How may the Superintendent authorize traditional gathering and removal? After receiving a request from an Indian tribe to gather plants or plant parts within a park area, the Superintendent may enter into an agreement with the tribe to authorize the traditional gathering and removal of plants or plant parts for traditional purposes. The agreement will describe the terms and conditions under which the Superintendent may issue a gathering permit to the tribe under § 1.6 of this chapter. The permit will designate the enrolled tribal members who are authorized to gather and remove plants or plant parts within the park area.

(c) How must a tribe request to enter into an agreement? (1) A tribal official must submit to the Superintendent a written request to enter into an agreement under this section that contains the following:

(i) A description of the Indian tribe's traditional association to the park area;

(ii) A description of the traditional purposes to which the traditional gathering activities will relate; and

(iii) A description of the traditional gathering and removal activities that the tribe is interested in conducting, including a list of the plants or plant parts that tribal members wish to gather and the methods by which those plants or plant parts will be gathered.

(2) Within 90 days after receiving a request that contains the information required by paragraph (c)(1) of this section, the Superintendent will initiate consultation with the requesting tribe in order to develop an agreement. If a Superintendent fails to initiate consultation within 90 days after receiving such a request, then the tribe may submit the request to the Regional Director. The Superintendent will also consult with any other tribe that has gathering rights in that park area under a treaty or federal statute or is party to a valid plant-gathering agreement with the NPS for that park area.

(d) What are the requirements for entering into agreements? Before entering into an agreement to allow gathering and removal, the Superintendent must:

(1) Determine, based on available information, including information provided by the tribe itself, that the tribe has a traditional association with the park area and is proposing to gather and remove plants or plant parts within the park area for a traditional purpose; and

(2) Comply with all applicable federal laws, including the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, the National Historic Preservation Act, and the Endangered Species Act. The compliance for the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 must consist of an environmental assessment and must conclude with a finding of no significant impact, which must also document the determinations required by paragraph (d)(1) of this section. The Superintendent may not enter into an agreement that will have a significant adverse impact on park area resources or values.

(e) When must the Superintendent deny a tribe's request to enter into a gathering agreement? The Superintendent must deny a tribe's request to enter into a gathering agreement if any of the requirements of paragraph (d) of this section are not satisfied.

(f) What must agreements contain and how will they be implemented? (1) An agreement to gather and remove plants or plant parts must contain the following:

(i) The name of the Indian tribe authorized to gather and remove plants and plant parts;

(ii) The basis for the tribe's eligibility under paragraphs (c)(1)(i) and (ii) of this section to enter into the agreement;

(iii) A description of the system to be used to administer traditional gathering and removal, including a clear means of identifying the enrolled tribal members who, under the permit, are designated by the Indian tribe to gather and remove;

(iv) A means for the tribal government to keep the NPS regularly informed of which enrolled tribal members are designated by the tribe to gather and remove;

(v) A description of the specific plants or plant parts that may be gathered and removed. The gathering agreement may not authorize the gathering of any species listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act;

(vi) Specification of the size and quantity of the plants or plant parts that may be gathered and removed;

(vii) Identification of the times and locations at which the plants or plant parts may be gathered and removed;

(viii) A statement that plants or plant parts may be gathered only by traditional gathering methods, i.e., only by hand or hand tools;

(ix) A statement that the sale or commercial use of natural products (including plants or plant parts gathered under the agreement) is prohibited in the park area under § 2.1(c)(3)(v);

(x) Protocols for monitoring traditional gathering and removal activities and thresholds above which NPS and tribal management intervention will occur;

(xi) A requirement that the NPS and the tribe engage in periodic reviews of the status of traditional gathering activities under the agreement through consultation;

(xii) Operating protocols and additional remedies for non-compliance with the terms of the agreement beyond those provided in this section, including mitigation, restoration, and remediation;

(xiii) A requirement that a permit issued under the agreement identify the tribal members who are designated by the tribe to gather plants or plant parts under the permit;

(xiv) A list of key officials; and

(xv) Any additional terms or conditions that the parties may agree upon.

(2) Agreements will be implemented through a permit issued in accordance with § 1.6 of this chapter. Activities allowed by a permit must fall within the scope of activities agreed upon in the agreement.

(g) What concurrence must the Superintendent obtain? Before executing any gathering agreement, the Superintendent must obtain the written concurrence of the Regional Director.

(h) When may the Superintendent close areas to gathering and removal? (1) Notwithstanding the terms of any agreement or permit executed under this section, the Superintendent may close park areas, or portions thereof, to the traditional gathering and removal of plants or plant products for any of the following reasons:

(i) Maintenance of public health and safety;

(ii) Protection of environmental or scenic values;

(iii) Protection of natural or cultural resources;

(iv) Aid to scientific research;

(v) Implementation of management plans; or

(vi) Avoidance of conflict among visitor use activities.

(2) Closed areas may not be reopened to traditional gathering and removal until the reasons for the closure have been resolved.

(3) Except in emergency situations, the Superintendent will provide public notice of any closure under this section in accordance with § 1.7 of this chapter. The Superintendent will also provide written notice of the closure directly to any tribe that has an agreement to gather and remove plants or plant parts from the closed area.

(i) When may the Superintendent suspend or terminate an agreement or permit?

(1) The Superintendent may suspend or terminate a gathering agreement or implementing permit if the tribe or a tribal member violates any term or condition of the agreement or the permit.

(2) The Superintendent may suspend or terminate a gathering agreement or implementing permit if unanticipated or significant adverse impacts to park area resources or values occur.

(3) If a Superintendent suspends or terminates a gathering agreement or implementing permit, then the Superintendent must prepare a written determination justifying the action and must provide a copy of the determination to the tribe.

(4) Before terminating a gathering agreement or implementing permit, the Superintendent must obtain the written concurrence of the Regional Director.

(j) When is gathering prohibited? Gathering, possession, or removal from a park area of plants or plant parts (including for traditional purposes) is prohibited except where specifically authorized by:

(1) Federal statutory law;

(2) Treaty rights;

(3) Other regulations of this chapter; or

(4) An agreement and permit issued under this section.

(k) How may a tribe appeal a Superintendent's decision not to enter into a gathering agreement under this rule? If a Superintendent denies a tribe's request to enter into a gathering agreement, then the Superintendent will provide the tribe with a written decision setting forth the reasons for the denial. Within 60 days after receiving the Superintendent's written decision, the tribe may appeal, in writing, the Superintendent's decision to the Regional Director. The appeal should set forth the substantive factual or legal bases for the tribe's disagreement with the Superintendent's decision and any other information the tribe wishes the Regional Director to consider. Within 45 days after receiving the tribe's written appeal, the Regional Director will issue and send to the tribe a written decision that affirms, reverses, or modifies the Superintendent's decision. The Regional Director's appeal decision will constitute the final agency action on the matter. Appeals under this section constitute an administrative review and are not conducted as an adjudicative proceeding.

(l) Have the information collection requirements been approved? The Office of Management and Budget has reviewed and approved the information collection requirements in this section and assigned OMB Control No. 1024-0271. We will use this information to determine whether a traditional association and purpose can be documented in order to authorize traditional gathering. We may not conduct or sponsor and you are not required to respond to, a collection of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. You may send comments on any aspect of this information collection to the Information Collection Clearance Officer, National Park Service, 12201 Sunrise Valley Drive (Mail Stop 242), Reston, VA 20192.

[81 FR 45037, July 12, 2016]
§ 2.10 - Camping and food storage.

(a) The superintendent may require permits, designate sites or areas, and establish conditions for camping.

(b) The following are prohibited:

(1) Digging or leveling the ground at a campsite.

(2) Leaving camping equipment, site alterations, or refuse after departing from the campsite.

(3) Camping within 25 feet of a water hydrant or main road, or within 100 feet of a flowing stream, river or body of water, except as designated.

(4) Creating or sustaining unreasonable noise between the hours of 10:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m., considering the nature and purpose of the actor's conduct, impact on park users, location, and other factors which would govern the conduct of a reasonably prudent person under the circumstances.

(5) The installation of permanent camping facilities.

(6) Displaying wildlife carcasses or other remains or parts thereof, except when taken pursuant to § 2.2.

(7) Connecting to a utility system, except as designated.

(8) Failing to obtain a permit, where required.

(9) Violating conditions which may be established by the superintendent.

(10) Camping outside of designated sites or areas.

(c) Violation of the terms and conditions of a permit issued in accordance with this section is prohibited and may result in the suspension or revocation of the permit.

(d) Food storage. The superintendent may designate all or a portion of a park area where food, lawfully taken fish or wildlife, garbage, and equipment used to cook or store food must be kept sealed in a vehicle, or in a camping unit that is constructed of solid, non-pliable material, or suspended at least 10 feet above the ground and 4 feet horizontally from a post, tree trunk, or other object, or shall be stored as otherwise designated. Violation of this restriction is prohibited. This restriction does not apply to food that is being transported, consumed, or prepared for consumption.

§ 2.11 - Picnicking.

Picnicking is allowed, except in designated areas closed in accordance with § 1.5. The superintendent may establish conditions for picnicking in areas where picnicking is allowed. Picnicking in violation of established conditions is prohibited.

§ 2.12 - Audio disturbances.

(a) The following are prohibited:

(1) Operating motorized equipment or machinery such as an electric generating plant, motor vehicle, motorized toy, or an audio device, such as a radio, television set, tape deck or musical instrument, in a manner: (i) That exceeds a noise level of 60 decibels measured on the A-weighted scale at 50 feet; or, if below that level, nevertheless; (ii) makes noise which is unreasonable, considering the nature and purpose of the actor's conduct, location, time of day or night, purpose for which the area was established, impact on park users, and other factors that would govern the conduct of a reasonably prudent person under the circumstances.

(2) In developed areas, operating a power saw, except pursuant to the terms and conditions of a permit.

(3) In nondeveloped areas, operating any type of portable motor or engine, or device powered by a portable motor or engine, except pursuant to the terms and conditions of a permit. This paragraph does not apply to vessels in areas where motor boating is allowed.

(4) Operating a public address system, except in connection with a public gathering or special event for which a permit has been issued pursuant to § 2.50 or § 2.51.

(b) Violation of the terms and conditions of a permit issued in accordance with section is prohibited and may result in the suspension or revocation of the permit.

§ 2.13 - Fires.

(a) The following are prohibited:

(1) Lighting or maintaining a fire, except in designated areas or receptacles and under conditions that may be established by the superintendent.

(2) Using stoves or lanterns in violation of established restrictions.

(3) Lighting, tending, or using a fire, stove or lantern in a manner that threatens, causes damage to, or results in the burning of property, real property or park resources, or creates a public safety hazard.

(4) Leaving a fire unattended.

(5) Throwing or discarding lighted or smoldering material in a manner that threatens, causes damage to, or results in the burning of property or park resources, or creates a public safety hazard.

(b) Fires shall be extinguished upon termination of use and in accordance with such conditions as may be established by the superintendent. Violation of these conditions is prohibited.

(c) During periods of high fire danger, the superintendent may close all or a portion of a park area to the lighting or maintaining of a fire.

(d) The regulations contained in this section apply, regardless of land ownership, on all lands and waters within a park area that are under the legislative jurisdiction of the United States.

[48 FR 30282, June 30, 1983, as amended at 52 FR 35240, Sept. 18, 1987]
§ 2.14 - Sanitation and refuse.

(a) The following are prohibited:

(1) Disposing of refuse in other than refuse receptacles.

(2) Using government refuse receptacles or other refuse facilities for dumping household, commercial, or industrial refuse, brought as such from private or municipal property, except in accordance with conditions established by the superintendent.

(3) Depositing refuse in the plumbing fixtures or vaults of a toilet facility.

(4) Draining refuse from a trailer or other vehicle, except in facilities provided for such purpose.

(5) Bathing, or washing food, clothing, dishes, or other property at public water outlets, fixtures or pools, except at those designated for such purpose.

(6) Polluting or contaminating park area waters or water courses.

(7) Disposing of fish remains on land, or in waters within 200 feet of boat docks or designated swimming beaches, or within developed areas, except as otherwise designated.

(8) In developed areas, the disposal of human body waste, except at designated locations or in fixtures provided for that purpose.

(9) In nondeveloped areas, the disposal of human body waste within 100 feet of a water source, high water mark of a body of water, or a campsite, or within sight of a trail, except as otherwise designated.

(b) The superintendent may establish conditions concerning the disposal, containerization, or carryout of human body waste. Violation of these conditions is prohibited.

§ 2.15 - Pets.

(a) The following are prohibited:

(1) Possessing a pet in a public building, public transportation vehicle, or location designated as a swimming beach, or any structure or area closed to the possession of pets by the superintendent. This subparagraph shall not apply to guide dogs accompanying visually impaired persons or hearing ear dogs accompanying hearing-impaired persons.

(2) Failing to crate, cage, restrain on a leash which shall not exceed six feet in length, or otherwise physically confine a pet at all times.

(3) Leaving a pet unattended and tied to an object, except in designated areas or under conditions which may be established by the superintendent.

(4) Allowing a pet to make noise that is unreasonable considering location, time of day or night, impact on park users, and other relevant factors, or that frightens wildlife by barking, howling, or making other noise.

(5) Failing to comply with pet excrement disposal conditions which may be established by the superintendent.

(b) In park areas where hunting is allowed, dogs may be used in support of these activities in accordance with applicable Federal and State laws and in accordance with conditions which may be established by the superintendent.

(c) Pets or feral animals that are running-at-large and observed by an authorized person in the act of killing, injuring or molesting humans, livestock, or wildlife may be destroyed if necessary for public safety or protection of wildlife, livestock, or other park resources.

(d) Pets running-at-large may be impounded, and the owner may be charged reasonable fees for kennel or boarding costs, feed, veterinarian fees, transportation costs, and disposal. An impounded pet may be put up for adoption or otherwise disposed of after being held for 72 hours from the time the owner was notified of capture or 72 hours from the time of capture if the owner is unknown.

(e) Pets may be kept by residents of park areas consistent with the provisions of this section and in accordance with conditions which may be established by the superintendent. Violation of these conditions is prohibited.

(f) This section does not apply to dogs used by authorized Federal, State and local law enforcement officers in the performance of their official duties.

§ 2.16 - Horses and pack animals.

The following are prohibited:

(a) The use of animals other than those designated as “pack animals” for purposes of transporting equipment.

(b) The use of horses or pack animals outside of trails, routes or areas designated for their use.

(c) The use of horses or pack animals on a park road, except: (1) Where such travel is necessary to cross to or from designated trails, or areas, or privately owned property, and no alternative trails or routes have been designated; or (2) when the road has been closed to motor vehicles.

(d) Free-trailing or loose-herding of horses or pack animals on trails, except as designated.

(e) Allowing horses or pack animals to proceed in excess of a slow walk when passing in the immediate vicinity of persons on foot or bicycle.

(f) Obstructing a trail, or making an unreasonable noise or gesture, considering the nature and purpose of the actor's conduct, and other factors that would govern the conduct of a reasonably prudent person, while horses or pack animals are passing.

(g) Violation of conditions which may be established by the superintendent concerning the use of horses or pack animals.

§ 2.17 - Aircraft and air delivery.

(a) The following are prohibited:

(1) Operating or using aircraft on lands or waters other than at locations designated pursuant to special regulations.

(2) Where a water surface is designated pursuant to paragraph (a)(1) of this section, operating or using aircraft under power on the water within 500 feet of locations designated as swimming beaches, boat docks, piers, or ramps, except as otherwise designated.

(3) Delivering or retrieving a person or object by parachute, helicopter, or other airborne means, except in emergencies involving public safety or serious property loss, or pursuant to the terms and conditions of a permit.

(b) The provisions of this section, other than paragraph (c) of this section, shall not be applicable to official business of the Federal government, or emergency rescues in accordance with the directions of the superintendent, or to landings due to circumstances beyond the control of the operator.

(c)(1) Except as provided in paragraph (c)(3) of this section, the owners of a downed aircraft shall remove the aircraft and all component parts thereof in accordance with procedures established by the superintendent. In establishing removal procedures, the superintendent is authorized to: (i) Establish a reasonable date by which aircraft removal operations must be complete; (ii) determine times and means of access to and from the downed aircraft; and (iii) specify the manner or method of removal.

(2) Failure to comply with procedures and conditions established under paragraph (c)(1) of this section is prohibited.

(3) The superintendent may waive the requirements of paragraph (c)(1) of this section or prohibit the removal of downed aircraft, upon a determination that: (i) The removal of downed aircraft would constitute an unacceptable risk to human life; (ii) the removal of a downed aircraft would result in extensive resource damage; or (iii) the removal of a downed aircraft is impracticable or impossible.

(d) The use of aircraft shall be in accordance with regulations of the Federal Aviation Administration. Such regulations are adopted as a part of these regulations.

(e) The operation or use of hovercraft is prohibited.

(f) Violation of the terms and conditions of a permit issued in accordance with this section is prohibited and may result in the suspension or revocation of the permit.

§ 2.18 - Snowmobiles.

(a) Notwithstanding the definition of vehicle set forth in § 1.4 of this chapter, the provisions of §§ 4.4, 4.12, 4.13, 4.14, 4.20, 4.21, 4.22 and 4.23 of this chapter apply to the operation of a snowmobile.

(b) Except as otherwise provided in this section, the laws of the State in which the exterior boundaries of a park area or a portion thereof is located shall govern equipment standards and the operation of snowmobiles. Nonconflicting State laws are adopted as a part of these regulations.

(c) The use of snowmobiles is prohibited, except on designated routes and water surfaces that are used by motor vehicles or motorboats during other seasons. Routes and water surfaces designated for snowmobile use shall be promulgated as special regulations. Snowmobiles are prohibited except where designated and only when their use is consistent with the park's natural, cultural, scenic and aesthetic values, safety considerations, park management objectives, and will not disturb wildlife or damage park resources.

(d) The following are prohibited:

(1) Operating a snowmobile that makes excessive noise. Excessive noise for snowmobiles manufactured after July 1, 1975 is a level of total snowmobile noise that exceeds 78 decibels measured on the A-weighted scale measured at 50 feet. Snowmobiles manufactured between July 1, 1973 and July 1, 1975 shall not register more than 82 decibels on the A-weighted scale at 50 feet. Snowmobiles manufactured prior to July 1, 1973 shall not register more than 86 decibels on the A-weighted scale at 50 feet. All decibel measurements shall be based on snowmobile operation at or near full throttle.

(2) Operating a snowmobile without a lighted white headlamp and red taillight from one half-hour after sunset to one half-hour before sunrise, or when persons and vehicles are not clearly visible for a distance of 500 feet.

(3) Operating a snowmobile that does not have brakes in good working order.

(4) Racing, or operating a snowmobile in excess of 45 mph, unless restricted in accordance with § 4.22 of this chapter or otherwise designated.

(e) Except where State law prescribes a different minimum age or qualification for the person providing direct supervision and accompaniment, the following are prohibited:

(1) The operation of a snowmobile by a person under 16 years of age unless accompanied and supervised within line of sight by a responsible person 21 years of age or older;

(2) The operation of a snowmobile by a person under 12 years of age, unless accompanied on the same machine by a responsible person 21 years of age or older; or

(3) The supervision by one person of the operation of snowmobiles by more than one person under 16 years of age.

[48 FR 30282, June 30, 1983, as amended at 52 FR 10683, Apr. 2, 1987]
§ 2.19 - Winter activities.

(a) Skiing, snowshoeing, ice skating, sledding, innertubing, tobogganing and similar winter sports are prohibited on park roads and in parking areas open to motor vehicle traffic, except as otherwise designated.

(b) The towing of persons on skis, sleds, or other sliding devices by motor vehicle or snowmobile is prohibited, except in designated areas or routes. This paragraph shall not apply to sleds designed to be towed behind snowmobiles and joined to the snowmobile with a rigid hitching mechanism.

(c) Failure to abide by area designations or activity restrictions established under this section is prohibited.

§ 2.20 - Skating, skateboards, and similar devices.

Using roller skates, skateboards, roller skis, coasting vehicles, or similar devices is prohibited, except in designated areas.

§ 2.21 - Smoking.

(a) The superintendent may designate a portion of a park area, or all or a portion of a building, structure or facility as closed to smoking when necessary to protect park resources, reduce the risk of fire, or prevent conflicts among visitor use activities. Smoking in an area or location so designated is prohibited.

(b) Smoking is prohibited within all caves and caverns.

§ 2.22 - Property.

(a) The following are prohibited:

(1) Abandoning property.

(2) Leaving property unattended for longer than 24 hours, except in locations where longer time periods have been designated or in accordance with conditions established by the superintendent.

(3) Failing to turn in found property to the superintendent as soon as practicable.

(b) Impoundment of property. (1) Property determined to be left unattended in excess of an allowed period of time may be impounded by the superintendent.

(2) Unattended property that interferes with visitor safety, orderly management of the park area, or presents a threat to park resources may be impounded by the superintendent at any time.

(3) Found or impounded property shall be inventoried to determine ownership and safeguard personal property.

(4) The owner of record is responsible and liable for charges to the person who has removed, stored, or otherwise disposed of property impounded pursuant to this section; or the superintendent may assess the owner reasonable fees for the impoundment and storage of property impounded pursuant to this section.

(c) Disposition of property. (1) Unattended property impounded pursuant to this section shall be deemed to be abandoned unless claimed by the owner or an authorized representative thereof within 60 days. The 60-day period shall begin when the rightful owner of the property has been notified, if the owner can be identified, or from the time the property was placed in the superintendent's custody, if the owner cannot be identified.

(2) Unclaimed, found property shall be stored for a minimum period of 60 days and, unless claimed by the owner or an authorized representative thereof, may be claimed by the finder, provided that the finder is not an employee of the National Park Service. Found property not claimed by the owner or an authorized representative or the finder shall be deemed abandoned.

(3) Abandoned property shall be disposed of in accordance with title 41 Code of Federal Regulations.

(4) Property, including real property, located within a park area and owned by a deceased person, shall be disposed of in accordance with the laws of the State within whose exterior boundaries the property is located.

(d) The regulations contained in paragraphs (a)(2), (b) and (c) of this section apply, regardless of land ownership, on all lands and waters within a park area that are under the legislative jurisdiction of the United States.

[48 FR 30282, June 30, 1983, as amended at 52 FR 35240, Sept. 18, 1987]
§ 2.23 - Recreation fees.

(a) Recreation fees shall be established as provided for in part 71 of this chapter.

(b) Entering designated entrance fee areas or using specialized sites, facilities, equipment or services, or participating in group activities, recreation events, or other specialized recreation uses for which recreation fees have been established without paying the required fees and possessing the applicable permits is prohibited. Violation of the terms and conditions of a permit issued in accordance with part 71 is prohibited and may result in the suspension or revocation of the permit.

(c) The superintendent may, when in the public interest, prescribe periods during which the collection of recreation fees shall be suspended.

§ 2.30 - Misappropriation of property and services.

(a) The following are prohibited:

(1) Obtaining or exercising unlawful possession over the property of another with the purpose to deprive the owner of the property.

(2) Obtaining property or services offered for sale or compensation without making payment or offering to pay.

(3) Obtaining property or services offered for sale or compensation by means of deception or a statement of past, present or future fact that is instrumental in causing the wrongful transfer of property or services, or using stolen, forged, expired revoked or fraudulently obtained credit cards or paying with negotiable paper on which payment is refused.

(4) Concealing unpurchased merchandise on or about the person without the knowledge or consent of the seller or paying less than purchase price by deception.

(5) Acquiring or possessing the property of another, with knowledge or reason to believe that the property is stolen.

(b) The regulations contained in this section apply, regardless of land ownership, on all lands and waters within a park area that are under the legislative jurisdiction of the United States.

[48 FR 30282, June 30, 1983, as amended at 52 FR 35240, Sept. 18, 1987]
§ 2.31 - Trespassing, tampering and vandalism.

(a) The following are prohibited:

(1) Trespassing. Trespassing, entering or remaining in or upon property or real property not open to the public, except with the express invitation or consent of the person having lawful control of the property or real property.

(2) Tampering. Tampering or attempting to tamper with property or real property, or moving, manipulating or setting in motion any of the parts thereof, except when such property is under one's lawful control or possession.

(3) Vandalism. Destroying, injuring, defacing, or damaging property or real property.

(4) Harassment. Intentional or reckless harassment of park visitors with physical contact.

(5) Obstruction. Intentional or reckless obstruction of any sidewalk, trail, highway, building entranceway, railroad track, or public utility right-of-way, or other public passage, whether alone or with others. The mere gathering of persons to hear a speaker communicate, or simply being a member of such a gathering, does not constitute obstruction. An official may make a reasonable request or order that one or more persons move in order to prevent obstruction of a public passage, and refusal of such an order constitutes obstruction.

(b) The regulations contained in this section apply, regardless of land ownership, on all lands and waters within a park area that are under the legislative jurisdiction of the United States.

[48 FR 30282, June 30, 1983, as amended at 52 FR 35240, Sept. 18, 1987; 75 FR 64153, Oct. 19, 2010]
§ 2.32 - Interfering with agency functions.

(a) The following are prohibited:

(1) Interference. Threatening, resisting, intimidating, or intentionally interfering with a government employee or agent engaged in an official duty, or on account of the performance of an official duty.

(2) Lawful order. Violating the lawful order of a government employee or agent authorized to maintain order and control public access and movement during fire fighting operations, search and rescue operations, wildlife management operations involving animals that pose a threat to public safety, law enforcement actions, and emergency operations that involve a threat to public safety or park resources, or other activities where the control of public movement and activities is necessary to maintain order and public safety.

(3) False information. Knowingly giving a false or fictitious report or other false information: (i) To an authorized person investigating an accident or violation of law or regulation or; (ii) on an application for a permit.

(4) False Report. Knowingly giving a false report for the purpose of misleading a government employee or agent in the conduct of official duties, or making a false report that causes a response by the United States to a fictitious event.

(b) The regulations contained in this section apply, regardless of land ownership, on all lands and waters within a park area that are under the legislative jurisdiction of the United States.

[48 FR 30282, June 30, 1983, as amended at 52 FR 35240, Sept. 18, 1987]
§ 2.33 - Report of injury or damage.

(a) A person involved in an incident resulting in personal injury or property damage exceeding $300, other than an accident reportable under §§ 3.4 or 4.4 of this chapter, shall report the incident to the superintendent as soon as possible. This notification does not satisfy reporting requirements imposed by applicable State law.

(b) Failure to report an incident in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section is prohibited.

[48 FR 30282, June 30, 1983, as amended at 52 FR 10683, Apr. 2, 1987]
§ 2.34 - Disorderly conduct.

(a) A person commits disorderly conduct when, with intent to cause public alarm, nuisance, jeopardy or violence, or knowingly or recklessly creating a risk thereof, such person commits any of the following prohibited acts:

(1) Engages in fighting or threatening, or in violent behavior.

(2) Uses language, an utterance, or gesture, or engages in a display or act that is obscene, physically threatening or menacing, or done in a manner that is likely to inflict injury or incite an immediate breach of the peace.

(3) Makes noise that is unreasonable, considering the nature and purpose of the actor's conduct, location, time of day or night, and other factors that would govern the conduct of a reasonably prudent person under the circumstances.

(4) Creates or maintains a hazardous or physically offensive condition.

(b) The regulations contained in this section apply, regardless of land ownership, on all lands and waters within a park area that are under the legislative jurisdiction of the United States.

[48 FR 30282, June 30, 1983, as amended at 52 FR 35240, Sept. 18, 1987]
§ 2.35 - Alcoholic beverages and controlled substances.

(a) Alcoholic beverages. (1) The use and possession of alcoholic beverages within park areas is allowed in accordance with the provisions of this section.

(2) The following are prohibited:

(i) The sale or gift of an alcoholic beverage to a person under 21 years of age, except where allowed by State law. In a State where a lower minimum age is established, that age limit will apply for purposes of this subparagraph.

(ii) The possession of an alcoholic beverage by a person under 21 years of age, except where allowed by State law. In a State where a lower minimum age is established, that age will apply for purposes of this subparagraph.

(3)(i) The superintendent may close all or a portion of a public use area or public facility within a park area to the consumption of alcoholic beverages and/or to the possession of a bottle, can or other receptacle containing an alcoholic beverage that is open, or that has been opened, or whose seal is broken or the contents of which have been partially removed. Provided however, that such a closure may only be implemented following a determination made by the superintendent that:

(A) The consumption of an alcoholic beverage or the possession of an open container of an alcoholic beverage would be inappropriate considering other uses of the location and the purpose for which it is maintained or established; or

(B) Incidents of aberrant behavior related to the consumption of alcoholic beverages are of such magnitude that the diligent application of the authorities in this section and §§ 1.5 and 2.34 of this chapter, over a reasonable time period, does not alleviate the problem.

(ii) A closure imposed by the superintendent does not apply to an open container of an alcoholic beverage that is stored in compliance with the provisions of § 4.14 of this chapter.

(iii) Violating a closure imposed pursuant to this section is prohibited.

(b) Controlled substances. The following are prohibited:

(1) The delivery of a controlled substance, except when distribution is made by a practitioner in accordance with applicable law. For the purposes of this paragraph, delivery means the actual, attempted or constructive transfer of a controlled substance whether or not there exists an agency relationship.

(2) The possession of a controlled substance, unless such substance was obtained by the possessor directly, or pursuant to a valid prescription or order, from a practitioner acting in the course of professional practice or otherwise allowed by Federal or State law.

(c) Presence in a park area when under the influence of alcohol or a controlled substance to a degree that may endanger oneself or another person, or damage property or park resources, is prohibited.

[48 FR 30282, June 30, 1983, as amended at 52 FR 10683, Apr. 2, 1987]
§ 2.36 - Gambling.

(a) Gambling in any form, or the operation of gambling devices, is prohibited.

(b) This regulation applies, regardless of land ownership, on all lands and waters within a park area that are under the legislative jurisdiction of the United States.

[48 FR 30282, June 30, 1983, as amended at 52 FR 35240, Sept. 18, 1987]
§ 2.37 - Noncommercial soliciting.

Soliciting or demanding gifts, money, goods or services is prohibited, except pursuant to the terms and conditions of a permit that has been issued under § 2.50, § 2.51 or § 2.52.

§ 2.38 - Explosives.

(a) Using, possessing, storing, or transporting explosives, blasting agents or explosive materials is prohibited, except pursuant to the terms and conditions of a permit. When permitted, the use, possession, storage and transportation shall be in accordance with applicable Federal and State laws.

(b) Using or possessing fireworks and firecrackers is prohibited, except pursuant to the terms and conditions of a permit or in designated areas under such conditions as the superintendent may establish, and in accordance with applicable State law.

(c) Violation of the conditions established by the superintendent or of the terms and conditions of a permit issued in accordance with this section is prohibited and may result in the suspension or revocation of the permit.

§ 2.50 - Special events.

(a) Sports events, pageants, regattas, public spectator attractions, entertainments, ceremonies, and similar events are allowed: Provided, however, There is a meaningful association between the park area and the events, and the observance contributes to visitor understanding of the significance of the park area, and a permit therefor has been issued by the superintendent. A permit shall be denied if such activities would:

(1) Cause injury or damage to park resources; or

(2) Be contrary to the purposes for which the natural, historic, development and special use zones were established; or unreasonably impair the atmosphere of peace and tranquility maintained in wilderness, natural, historic, or commemorative zones.

(3) Unreasonably interfere with interpretive, visitor service, or other program activities, or with the administrative activities of the National Park Service; or

(4) Substantially impair the operation of public use facilities or services of National Park Service concessioners or contractors; or

(5) Present a clear and present danger to the public health and safety; or

(6) Result in significant conflict with other existing uses.

(b) An application for such a permit shall set forth the name of the applicant, the date, time, duration, nature and place of the proposed event, an estimate of the number of persons expected to attend, a statement of equipment and facilities to be used, and any other information required by the superintendent. The application shall be submitted so as to reach the superintendent at least 72 hours in advance of the proposed event.

(c) As a condition of permit issuance, the superintendent may require:

(1) The filing of a bond payable to the Director, in an amount adequate to cover costs such as restoration, rehabilitation, and cleanup of the area used, and other costs resulting from the special event. In lieu of a bond, a permittee may elect to deposit cash equal to the amount of the required bond.

(2) In addition to the requirements of paragraph (c)(1) of this section, the acquisition of liability insurance in which the United States is named as co-insured in an amount sufficient to protect the United States.

(d) The permit may contain such conditions as are reasonably consistent with protection and use of the park area for the purposes for which it is established. It may also contain reasonable limitations on the equipment used and the time and area within which the event is allowed.

(e) Violation of the terms and conditions of a permit issued in accordance with this section is prohibited and may result in the suspension or revocation of the permit.

[48 FR 30282, June 30, 1983; 48 FR 31847, July 11, 1983]
§ 2.51 - Demonstrations and designated available park areas.

(a) Demonstrations. The term “demonstrations” includes demonstrations, picketing, speechmaking, marching, holding vigils or religious services, and all other like forms of conduct that involve the communication or expression of views or grievances, engaged in by one or more persons, the conduct of which is reasonably likely to attract a crowd or onlookers. This term does not include casual park use by visitors or tourists that is not reasonably likely to attract a crowd or onlookers.

(b) Permits and the small group permit exception. Demonstrations are allowed within park areas designated as available under paragraph (c)(2) of this section, when the superintendent has issued a permit for the activity, except that:

(1) Demonstrations involving 25 persons or fewer may be held without a permit within designated park areas, provided that:

(i) None of the reasons for denying a permit that are set out in paragraph (f) of this section are present;

(ii) The group is not merely an extension of another group already availing itself of the small group permit exception under this provision;

(iii) They will not unreasonably interfere with other permitted demonstrations and special events, or park program activities; and

(iv) Hand-carried signs may be used, but stages, platforms, or structures may not be used.

(2) While it is not mandatory, the organizer is requested to provide reasonable notice of the proposed event to the park superintendent, including whether there is any reason to believe that there may be an attempt to disrupt, protest, or prevent the activity.

(3) The 25-person maximum for the small group permit exception may be reduced for a designated available area, but only if:

(i) A written determination that a 25-person group cannot be reasonably physically accommodated within that area is approved by the regional director; and

(ii) The written determination is made available at the office of the superintendent and by public notice under § 1.7 of this chapter.

(4) In the event that two or more groups taking advantage of the small group permit exception seek to use the same designated available area at the same time, and the area cannot reasonably accommodate multiple occupancy, the superintendent will, whenever possible, direct the later-arriving group to relocate to another nearby designated available area.

(c) Designated available park areas. (1) Locations may be designated as available for demonstrations under this section, and for the sale or distribution of printed matter and the free distribution of other message-bearing items under § 2.52, only if these activities would not:

(i) Cause injury or damage to park resources;

(ii) Unreasonably impair the atmosphere of peace and tranquility maintained in wilderness, natural, historic, or commemorative zones;

(iii) Unreasonably interfere with interpretive, visitor service, or other program activities, or with the administrative activities of the National Park Service;

(iv) Substantially impair the operation of public use facilities or services of National Park Service concessioners, holders of commercial use authorizations, or contractors;

(v) Present a clear and present danger to the public health and safety; or

(vi) Be incompatible with the nature and traditional use of the particular park area involved.

(2) The superintendent must designate on a map, which must be available in the office of the superintendent and by public notice under § 1.7 of this chapter, the locations designated as available for demonstrations, the sale or distribution of printed matter, and the free distribution of other message bearing items.

(d) Application for permit. A permit application must provide:

(1) The name of the applicant or the name of the organization (if any);

(2) The date, time, duration, nature, and place of the proposed event;

(3) An estimate of the number of persons expected to attend;

(4) A statement of equipment and facilities to be used;

(5) Whether there is any reason to believe that there will be an attempt to disrupt, protest, or prevent the event; and

(6) Any other information required by the permit application form.

(e) The superintendent must not accept an application more than one year before the proposed event (including time required for set-up); applications received more than a year in advance will be returned to the applicant.

(f) Processing the application. The superintendent must issue a permit or a written denial within ten days of receiving a complete and fully executed application. A permit will be approved unless:

(1) The superintendent has granted or will grant a prior application for a permit for the same time and place, and the activities authorized by that permit do not reasonably allow multiple occupancy of that particular area;

(2) It reasonably appears that the event will present a clear and present danger to public health or safety;

(3) The event is of such nature or duration that it cannot reasonably be accommodated in the particular location applied for, considering such things as damage to park resources or facilities, impairment of a protected area's atmosphere of peace and tranquility, interference with program activities, or impairment of public use facilities;

(4) The location applied for has not been designated as available under paragraph (c)(2) of this section;

(5) The application was submitted more than one year before the proposed event (including set-up); or

(6) The activity would constitute a violation of an applicable law or regulation.

(g) Written denial of permit. If a permit is denied, the superintendent will inform the applicant in writing of the denial and the reasons for it.

(h) Permit conditions. The permit may contain conditions reasonably consistent with the requirements of public health and safety, protection of park resources, and the use of the park area for the purposes for which it was established. It may also contain reasonable limitations on the equipment used and the time and area within which the event is allowed.

(i) Permit duration. (1) Permits may be issued for a maximum of 14 consecutive days.

(2) A permit may be extended for up to 14 days, but a new application must be submitted for each extension requested.

(3) The extension may be denied if another applicant has requested use of the same location and the location cannot reasonably accommodate multiple occupancy.

(j) Violation prohibited. Violation of these regulations or the terms of the permit is prohibited.

(k) Permit revocation, termination of small group exception. (1) The superintendent may revoke a permit for any violation of its terms and conditions.

(2) The superintendent may revoke a permit, or order a small group permit exception activity to cease, when any of the conditions listed in paragraph (f) of this section exist.

(3) The superintendent will make the revocation or order to cease in writing, with the reasons clearly set forth. In emergency circumstances the superintendent will make an immediate verbal revocation or order to cease, followed by written confirmation within 72 hours.

[75 FR 64153, Oct. 19, 2010, as amended at 78 FR 37717, June 24, 2013; 80 FR 36476, June 25, 2015; 83 FR 2068, Jan. 16, 2018]
§ 2.52 - Sale of printed matter and the distribution of printed matter and other message-bearing items.

(a) Printed matter and other message-bearing items. The term “printed matter” means message-bearing textual printed material such as books, pamphlets, magazines, and leaflets, provided that it is not solely commercial advertising. The term “other message-bearing items” means a message-bearing item that is not “printed matter” and is not solely commercial advertising. Other message-bearing items include, but are not limited to: Readable electronic media such as CDs, DVDs, and flash drives; clothing and accessories such as hats and key chains; buttons; pins; and bumper stickers.

(b) Permits and the small group permit exception. The sale or distribution of printed matter, and the free distribution of other message-bearing items without asking for or demanding payment or donation, is allowed within park areas if it occurs in an area designated as available under § 2.51(c)(2) and when the superintendent has issued a permit for the activity, except that:

(1) Sale or distribution activity by 25 persons or fewer may be conducted without a permit within designated park areas, provided that:

(i) None of the reasons for denying a permit that are set out in paragraph (e) of this section are present;

(ii) The group is not merely an extension of another group already availing itself of the small group permit exception under this provision;

(iii) The sale or distribution will not unreasonably interfere with other permitted demonstrations and special events, or program activities; and

(iv) Hand-carried signs may be used, but stages, platforms, or structures may not be used.

(2) While it is not mandatory, the organizer is requested to provide reasonable notice of the proposed event to the park superintendent, including whether there is any reason to believe that there may be an attempt to disrupt, protest, or prevent the activity.

(3) The 25-person maximum for the small group permit exception may be reduced for a designated available area, but only if:

(i) A written determination that a 25-person group cannot be reasonably physically accommodated within that area is approved by the regional director; and

(ii) The written determination is made available at the office of the superintendent and by public notice under § 1.7 of this chapter.

(4) In the event that two or more groups taking advantage of the small group permit exception seek to use the same designated available area at the same time, and the area cannot reasonably accommodate multiple occupancy, the superintendent will, whenever possible, direct the later arriving group to relocate to another nearby designated available area.

(c) Application for permit. An application must provide:

(1) The name of the applicant or the name of the organization (if any);

(2) The date, time, duration, nature, and place of the proposed event;

(3) An estimate of the number of persons expected to attend;

(4) A statement of equipment and facilities to be used;

(5) Whether there is any reason to believe that there will be an attempt to disrupt, protest, or prevent the event; and

(6) Any other information required by the permit application form.

(d) The superintendent must not accept an application more than one year before the proposed event (including time required for set-up); applications received more than a year in advance will be returned to the applicant.

(e) Processing the application. The superintendent must issue a permit or a written denial within ten days of receiving a complete and fully executed application. A permit will be approved unless:

(1) The superintendent has granted or will grant a prior application for a permit for the same time and place, and the activities authorized by that permit do not reasonably allow multiple occupancy of the particular area;

(2) It reasonably appears that the sale or distribution will present a clear and present danger to the public health and safety;

(3) The number of persons engaged in the sale or distribution exceeds the number that can reasonably be accommodated in the particular location applied for, considering such things as damage to park resources or facilities, impairment of a protected area's atmosphere of peace and tranquility, interference with program activities, or impairment of public use facilities;

(4) The location applied for has not been designated as available under § 2.51(c)(2);

(5) The application was submitted more than one year before the proposed event (including set-up); or

(6) The activity would constitute a violation of an applicable law or regulation.

(f) Written denial of permit. If a permit is denied, the superintendent will inform the applicant in writing of the denial and the reasons for it.

(g) Permit conditions. The permit may contain conditions reasonably consistent with the requirements of public health and safety, protection of park resources, and the use of the park area for the purposes for which it was established.

(h) Permit duration. (1) Permits may be issued for a maximum of 14 consecutive days.

(2) A permit may be extended for up to 14 days, but a new application must be submitted for each extension requested.

(3) The extension may be denied if another applicant has requested use of the same location and the location cannot reasonably accommodate multiple occupancy.

(i) Misrepresentation. Persons engaged in the sale or distribution of printed matter or the free distribution of other message-bearing items under this section are prohibited from misrepresenting the purposes or affiliations of those engaged in the sale or distribution, and misrepresenting whether the printed matter or other message-bearing items are available without cost or donation.

(j) Violation prohibited. Violation of these regulations or the terms of the permit is prohibited.

(k) Permit revocation, termination of small group exception. (1) The superintendent may revoke a permit for any violation of its terms and conditions.

(2) The superintendent may revoke a permit, or order a small group permit exception activity to cease, when any of the conditions listed in paragraph (e) of this section exist.

(3) The superintendent will make the revocation or order to cease in writing, with the reasons clearly set forth. In emergency circumstances the superintendent will make an immediate verbal revocation or order to cease, followed by written confirmation within 72 hours.

[75 FR 64154, Oct. 19, 2010, as amended at 78 FR 37717, June 24, 2013; 80 FR 36476, June 25, 2015; 83 FR 2069, Jan. 16, 2018]
§ 2.60 - Livestock use and agriculture.

(a) The running-at-large, herding, driving across, allowing on, pasturing or grazing of livestock of any kind in a park area or the use of a park area for agricultural purposes is prohibited, except:

(1) As specifically authorized by Federal statutory law; or

(2) As required under a reservation of use rights arising from acquisition of a tract of land; or

(3) As designated, when conducted as a necessary and integral part of a recreational activity or required in order to maintain a historic scene.

(b) Activities authorized pursuant to any of the exceptions provided for in paragraph (a) of this section shall be allowed only pursuant to the terms and conditions of a license, permit or lease. Violation of the terms and conditions of a license, permit or lease issued in accordance with this paragraph is prohibited and may result in the suspension or revocation of the license, permit, or lease.

(c) Impounding of livestock. (1) Livestock trespassing in a park area may be impounded by the superintendent and, if not claimed by the owner within the periods specified in this paragraph, shall be disposed of in accordance with applicable Federal and State law.

(2) In the absence of applicable Federal or State law, the livestock shall be disposed of in the following manner:

(i) If the owner is known, prompt written notice of impoundment will be served, and in the event of the owner's failure to remove the impounded livestock within five (5) days from delivery of such notice, it will be disposed of in accordance with this paragraph.

(ii) If the owner is unknown, disposal of the livestock shall not be made until at least fifteen (15) days have elapsed from the date that a notice of impoundment is originally published in a newspaper of general circulation in the county in which the trespass occurs or, if no such newspaper exists, notification is provided by other appropriate means.

(iii) The owner may redeem the livestock by submitting proof of ownership and paying all expenses of the United States for capturing, advertising, pasturing, feeding, impounding, and the amount of damage to public property injured or destroyed as a result of the trespass.

(iv) In determining the claim of the government in a livestock trespass, the value of forage consumed shall be computed at the commercial rates prevailing in the locality for the class of livestock found in trespass. The claim shall include the pro rata salary of employees for the time spent and the expenses incurred as a result of the investigation, reporting, and settlement or prosecution of the claim.

(v) If livestock impounded under this paragraph is offered at public sale and no bid is received, or if the highest bid received is less than the amount of the claim of the United States or of the officer's appraised value of the livestock, whichever is the lesser amount, such livestock, may be sold at private sale for the highest amount obtainable, condemned and destroyed, or converted to the use of the United States.

§ 2.61 - Residing on Federal lands.

(a) Residing in park areas, other than on privately owned lands, except pursuant to the terms and conditions of a permit, lease or contract, is prohibited.

(b) Violation of the terms and conditions of a permit issued in accordance with this section is prohibited and may result in the suspension or revocation of the permit.

§ 2.62 - Memorialization.

(a) The installation of a monument, memorial, tablet, structure, or other commemorative installation in a park area without the authorization of the Director is prohibited.

(b) The scattering of human ashes from cremation is prohibited, except pursuant to the terms and conditions of a permit, or in designated areas according to conditions which may be established by the superintendent.

(c) Failure to abide by area designations and established conditions is prohibited.

(d) Violation of the terms and conditions of a permit issued in accordance with this section is prohibited and may result in the suspension or revocation of the permit.

source: 48 FR 30282, June 30, 1983, unless otherwise noted.
cite as: 36 CFR 2.32