U.S Code last checked for updates: Jun 25, 2024
§ 2651a.
Organization of Department of State
(a)
Secretary of State
(1)
The Department of State shall be administered, in accordance with this Act and other provisions of law, under the supervision and direction of the Secretary of State (hereinafter referred to as the “Secretary”).
(2)
The Secretary, the Deputy Secretary of State, and the Deputy Secretary of State for Management and Resources shall be appointed by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate.
(3)
(A)
Notwithstanding any other provision of law and except as provided in this section, the Secretary shall have and exercise any authority vested by law in any office or official of the Department of State. The Secretary shall administer, coordinate, and direct the Foreign Service of the United States and the personnel of the Department of State, except where authority is inherent in or vested in the President.
(B)
(i)
The Secretary shall not have the authority of the Inspector General or the Chief Financial Officer.
(ii)
The Secretary shall not have any authority given expressly to diplomatic or consular officers.
(4)
The Secretary is authorized to promulgate such rules and regulations as may be necessary to carry out the functions of the Secretary of State and the Department of State. Unless otherwise specified in law, the Secretary may delegate authority to perform any of the functions of the Secretary or the Department to officers and employees under the direction and supervision of the Secretary. The Secretary may delegate the authority to redelegate any such functions.
(b)
Under Secretaries
(1)
In general
(2)
Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security
(3)
Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy
There shall be in the Department of State, among the Under Secretaries authorized by paragraph (1), an Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy, who shall have primary responsibility to assist the Secretary and the Deputy Secretary in the formation and implementation of United States public diplomacy policies and activities, including international educational and cultural exchange programs, information, and international broadcasting. The Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy shall—
(A)
prepare an annual strategic plan for public diplomacy in collaboration with overseas posts and in consultation with the regional and functional bureaus of the Department;
(B)
ensure the design and implementation of appropriate program evaluation methodologies;
(C)
provide guidance to Department personnel in the United States and overseas who conduct or implement public diplomacy policies, programs, and activities;
(D)
assist the United States Agency for International Development and the Broadcasting Board of Governors to present the policies of the United States clearly and effectively;
(E)
submit statements of United States policy and editorial material to the Broadcasting Board of Governors for broadcast consideration; and
(F)
coordinate the allocation and management of the financial and human resources for public diplomacy, including for—
(i)
the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs;
(ii)
the Bureau of Global Public Affairs;
(iii)
the Office of Policy, Planning, and Resources for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs;
(iv)
the Global Engagement Center; and
(v)
the public diplomacy functions within the regional and functional bureaus.
(4)
Nomination of Under Secretaries
(c)
Assistant Secretaries
(1)
In general
(2)
Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor
(A)
There shall be in the Department of State an Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor who shall be responsible to the Secretary of State for matters pertaining to human rights and humanitarian affairs (including matters relating to prisoners of war and members of the United States Armed Forces missing in action) in the conduct of foreign policy and such other related duties as the Secretary may from time to time designate. The Secretary of State shall carry out the Secretary’s responsibility under section 2304 of this title through the Assistant Secretary.
(B)
The Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor shall maintain continuous observation and review all matters pertaining to human rights and humanitarian affairs (including matters relating to prisoners of war and members of the United States Armed Forces missing in action) in the conduct of foreign policy including the following:
(i)
Gathering detailed information regarding humanitarian affairs and the observance of and respect for internationally recognized human rights in each country to which requirements of sections 2151n and 2304 of this title are relevant.
(ii)
Preparing the statements and reports to Congress required under section 2304 of this title.
(iii)
Making recommendations to the Secretary of State and the Administrator of the Agency for International Development regarding compliance with sections 2151n and 2304 of this title, and as part of the Assistant Secretary’s overall policy responsibility for the creation of United States Government human rights policy, advising the Administrator of the Agency for International Development on the policy framework under which section 2151n(e) projects are developed and consulting with the Administrator on the selection and implementation of such projects.
(iv)
Performing other responsibilities which serve to promote increased observance of internationally recognized human rights by all countries.
(3)
Assistant Secretary for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
(A)
In general
(B)
Areas of responsibility
The Assistant Secretary for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs shall maintain continuous observation and coordination of all matters pertaining to international narcotics, anti-crime, and law enforcement affairs in the conduct of foreign policy, including programs carried out by other United States Government agencies when such programs pertain to the following matters:
(i)
Combating international narcotics production and trafficking.
(ii)
Strengthening foreign justice systems, including judicial and prosecutorial capacity, appeals systems, law enforcement agencies, prison systems, and the sharing of recovered assets.
(iii)
Training and equipping foreign police, border control, other government officials, and other civilian law enforcement authorities for anti-crime purposes, including ensuring that no foreign security unit or member of such unit shall receive such assistance from the United States Government absent appropriate vetting.
(iv)
Ensuring the inclusion of human rights and women’s participation issues in law enforcement programs, in consultation with the Assistant Secretary for Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, and other senior officials in regional and thematic bureaus and offices.
(v)
Combating, in conjunction with other relevant bureaus of the Department of State and other United States Government agencies, all forms of transnational organized crime, including human trafficking, illicit trafficking in arms, wildlife, and cultural property, migrant smuggling, corruption, money laundering, the illicit smuggling of bulk cash, the licit use of financial systems for malign purposes, and other new and emerging forms of crime.
(vi)
Identifying and responding to global corruption, including strengthening the capacity of foreign government institutions responsible for addressing financial crimes and engaging with multilateral organizations responsible for monitoring and supporting foreign governments’ anti-corruption efforts.
(C)
Additional duties
In addition to the responsibilities specified in subparagraph (B), the Assistant Secretary for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs shall also—
(i)
carry out timely and substantive consultation with chiefs of mission and, as appropriate, the heads of other United States Government agencies to ensure effective coordination of all international narcotics and law enforcement programs carried out overseas by the Department and such other agencies;
(ii)
coordinate with the Office of National Drug Control Policy to ensure lessons learned from other United States Government agencies are available to the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs of the Department;
(iii)
develop standard requirements for monitoring and evaluation of Bureau programs, including metrics for success that do not rely solely on the amounts of illegal drugs that are produced or seized;
(iv)
in coordination with the Secretary of State, annually certify in writing to the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate that United States and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives enforcement personnel posted abroad whose activities are funded to any extent by the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs are complying with section 3927 of this title; and
(v)
carry out such other relevant duties as the Secretary may assign.
(D)
Rule of construction
(4)
Assistant Secretary for economic and business matters
(A)
In general
(B)
Matters contemplated
The matters referred to in subparagraph (A) include the following:
(i)
International trade and investment policy.
(ii)
International finance, economic development, and debt policy.
(iii)
Economic sanctions and combating terrorist financing.
(iv)
International transportation policy.
(v)
Support for United States businesses.
(vi)
Economic policy analysis and private sector outreach.
(vii)
International data privacy and innovation policies.
(viii)
Such other related duties as the Secretary may from time to time designate.
(C)
Coordination
(5)
Nomination of Assistant Secretaries
(d)
Other senior officials
(e)
Coordinator for Counterterrorism
(1)
In general
(2)
Duties
(A)
In general
(B)
Duties described
(3)
Rank and status of Ambassador
(f)
HIV/AIDS Response Coordinator
(1)
In general
(2)
Authorities and duties; definitions
(A)
Authorities
The Coordinator, acting through such nongovernmental organizations (including faith-based and community-based organizations), partner country finance, health, and other relevant ministries, and relevant executive branch agencies as may be necessary and appropriate to effect the purposes of this section, is authorized—
(i)
to operate internationally to carry out prevention, care, treatment, support, capacity development, and other activities for combatting HIV/AIDS;
(ii)
to transfer and allocate funds to relevant executive branch agencies; and
(iii)
to provide grants to, and enter into contracts with, nongovernmental organizations (including faith-based and community-based organizations), partner country finance, health, and other relevant ministries, to carry out the purposes of section.
(B)
Duties
(i)
In general
(ii)
Specific duties
The duties of the Coordinator shall specifically include the following:
(I)
Ensuring program and policy coordination among the relevant executive branch agencies and nongovernmental organizations, including auditing, monitoring, and evaluation of all such programs.
(II)
Ensuring that each relevant executive branch agency undertakes programs primarily in those areas where the agency has the greatest expertise, technical capabilities, and potential for success.
(III)
Avoiding duplication of effort.
(IV)
Establishing an interagency working group on HIV/AIDS headed by the Global AIDS Coordinator and comprised of representatives from the United States Agency for International Development and the Department of Health and Human Services, for the purposes of coordination of activities relating to HIV/AIDS, including—
(aa)
meeting regularly to review progress in partner countries toward HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment, and care objectives;
(bb)
participating in the process of identifying countries to consider for increased assistance based on the epidemiology of HIV/AIDS in those countries, including clear evidence of a public health threat, as well as government commitment to address the HIV/AIDS problem, relative need, and coordination and joint planning with other significant actors;
(cc)
assisting the Coordinator in the evaluation, execution, and oversight of country operational plans;
(dd)
reviewing policies that may be obstacles to reaching targets set forth for HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment, and care; and
(ee)
consulting with representatives from additional relevant agencies, including the National Institutes of Health, the Health Resources and Services Administration, the Department of Labor, the Department of Agriculture, the Millennium Challenge Corporation, the Peace Corps, and the Department of Defense.
(V)
Coordinating overall United States HIV/AIDS policy and programs, including ensuring the coordination of relevant executive branch agency activities in the field, with efforts led by partner countries, and with the assistance provided by other relevant bilateral and multilateral aid agencies and other donor institutions to promote harmonization with other programs aimed at preventing and treating HIV/AIDS and other health challenges, improving primary health, addressing food security, promoting education and development, and strengthening health care systems.
(VI)
Resolving policy, program, and funding disputes among the relevant executive branch agencies.
(VII)
Holding annual consultations with nongovernmental organizations in partner countries that provide services to improve health, and advocating on behalf of the individuals with HIV/AIDS and those at particular risk of contracting HIV/AIDS, including organizations with members who are living with HIV/AIDS.
(VIII)
Ensuring, through interagency and international coordination, that HIV/AIDS programs of the United States are coordinated with, and complementary to, the delivery of related global health, food security, development, and education.
(IX)
Directly approving all activities of the United States (including funding) relating to combatting HIV/AIDS in each of Botswana, Cote d’Ivoire, Ethiopia, Guyana, Haiti, Kenya, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Vietnam, Zambia, and other countries designated by the President, which other designated countries may include those countries in which the United States is implementing HIV/AIDS programs as of May 27, 2003, and other countries in which the United States is implementing HIV/AIDS programs as part of its foreign assistance program. In designating additional countries under this subparagraph, the President shall give priority to those countries in which there is a high prevalence of HIV or risk of significantly increasing incidence of HIV within the general population and inadequate financial means within the country.
(X)
Working with partner countries in which the HIV/AIDS epidemic is prevalent among injection drug users to establish, as a national priority, national HIV/AIDS prevention programs.
(XI)
Working with partner countries in which the HIV/AIDS epidemic is prevalent among individuals involved in commercial sex acts to establish, as a national priority, national prevention programs, including education, voluntary testing, and counseling, and referral systems that link HIV/AIDS programs with programs to eradicate trafficking in persons and support alternatives to prostitution.
(XII)
Establishing due diligence criteria for all recipients of funds appropriated for HIV/AIDS assistance pursuant to the authorization of appropriations under section 7671 of this title and all activities subject to the coordination and appropriate monitoring, evaluation, and audits carried out by the Coordinator necessary to assess the measurable outcomes of such activities.
(XIII)
Publicizing updated drug pricing data to inform the purchasing decisions of pharmaceutical procurement partners.
(C)
Definitions
In this paragraph:
(i)
AIDS
(ii)
HIV
(iii)
HIV/AIDS
(iv)
Relevant executive branch agencies
(g)
Bureau of Consular Affairs
(h)
Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration
(i)
Bureau of Cyberspace and Digital Policy
(1)
In general
(2)
Duties
(A)
In general
(B)
Duties described
The principal duties and responsibilities of the head of the Bureau shall, in furtherance of the diplomatic and foreign policy mission of the Department of State, be—
(i)
to serve as the principal cyberspace policy official within the senior management of the Department of State and as the advisor to the Secretary of State for cyberspace and digital issues;
(ii)
to lead, coordinate, and execute, in coordination with other relevant bureaus and offices, the Department of State’s diplomatic cyberspace, and cybersecurity efforts (including efforts related to data privacy, data flows, internet governance, information and communications technology standards, and other issues that the Secretary has assigned to the Bureau);
(iii)
to coordinate with relevant Federal agencies and the Office of the National Cyber Director to ensure the diplomatic and foreign policy aspects of the cyber strategy in section 9501 of the Department of State Authorization Act of 2022 [22 U.S.C. 10301] and any other subsequent strategy are implemented in a manner that is fully integrated with the broader strategy;
(iv)
to promote an open, interoperable, reliable, and secure information and communications technology infrastructure globally;
(v)
to represent the Secretary of State in interagency efforts to develop and advance Federal Government cyber priorities and activities, including efforts to develop credible national capabilities, strategies, and policies to deter and counter cyber adversaries, and carry out the purposes of title V of the Department of State Authorization Act of 2022;
(vi)
to engage civil society, the private sector, academia, and other public and private entities on relevant international cyberspace and international information and communications technology issues;
(vii)
to support United States Government efforts to uphold and further develop global deterrence frameworks for malicious cyber activity;
(viii)
to advise the Secretary of State and coordinate with foreign governments regarding responses to national security-level cyber incidents, including coordination on diplomatic response efforts to support allies and partners threatened by malicious cyber activity, in conjunction with members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and like-minded countries;
(ix)
to promote the building of foreign capacity relating to cyberspace policy priorities;
(x)
to promote an open, interoperable, reliable, and secure information and communications technology infrastructure globally and an open, interoperable, secure, and reliable internet governed by the multi-stakeholder model;
(xi)
to promote an international environment for technology investments and the internet that benefits United States economic and national security interests;
(xii)
to promote cross-border flow of data and combat international initiatives seeking to impose unreasonable requirements on United States businesses;
(xiii)
to promote international policies to protect the integrity of United States and international telecommunications infrastructure from foreign-based threats, including cyber-enabled threats;
(xiv)
to lead engagement, in coordination with relevant executive branch agencies, with foreign governments on relevant international cyberspace, cybersecurity, cybercrime, and digital economy issues described in title V of the Department of State Authorization Act of 2022;
(xv)
to promote international policies, in coordination with the Department of Commerce, to secure radio frequency spectrum in the best interests of the United States;
(xvi)
to promote and protect the exercise of human rights, including freedom of speech and religion, through the internet;
(xvii)
to build capacity of United States diplomatic officials to engage on cyberspace issues;
(xviii)
to encourage the development and adoption by foreign countries of internationally recognized standards, policies, and best practices;
(xix)
to support efforts by the Global Engagement Center to counter cyber-enabled information operations against the United States or its allies and partners; and
(xx)
to conduct such other matters as the Secretary of State may assign.
(3)
Qualifications
The head of the Bureau should be an individual of demonstrated competency in the fields of—
(A)
cybersecurity and other relevant cyberspace and information and communications technology policy issues; and
(B)
international diplomacy.
(4)
Organizational placement
(A)
Initial placement
(B)
Subsequent placement
The head of the Bureau may report to an Under Secretary of State or to an official holding a higher position than Under Secretary if, not later than 15 days before any change in such reporting structure, the Secretary of State—
(i)
consults with the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives; and
(ii)
submits a report to such committees that—
(I)
indicates that the Secretary, with respect to the reporting structure of the Bureau, has consulted with and solicited feedback from—
(aa)
other relevant Federal entities with a role in international aspects of cyber policy; and
(bb)
the elements of the Department of State with responsibility for aspects of cyber policy, including the elements reporting to—
(AA)
the Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs;
(BB)
the Under Secretary of State for Civilian Security, Democracy, and Human Rights;
(CC)
the Under Secretary of State for Economic Growth, Energy, and the Environment;
(DD)
the Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security Affairs;
(EE)
the Under Secretary of State for Management; and
(FF)
the Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs;
(II)
describes the new reporting structure for the head of the Bureau and the justification for such new structure; and
(III)
includes a plan describing how the new reporting structure will better enable the head of the Bureau to carry out the duties described in paragraph (2), including the security, economic, and human rights aspects of cyber diplomacy.
(5)
Special hiring authorities
The Secretary of State may—
(A)
appoint up to 25 employees to cyber positions in the Bureau without regard to the provisions of subchapter I of chapter 33 of title 5, regarding appointments in the competitive service; and
(B)
fix the rates of basic pay of such employees without regard to chapter 51 and subchapter III of chapter 53 of such title regarding classification and General Schedule pay rates, provided that the rates for such positions do not exceed the annual rate of basic pay in effect for a position at level IV of the Executive Schedule under section 5315 of title 5.
(6)
Coordination
(7)
Rule of construction
Nothing in this subsection may be construed—
(A)
to preclude the head of the Bureau from being designated as an Assistant Secretary, if such an Assistant Secretary position does not increase the number of Assistant Secretary positions at the Department above the number authorized under subsection (c)(1); or
(B)
to alter or modify the existing authorities of any other Federal agency or official.
(j)
Special appointments
(1)
Positions exercising significant authority
(2)
Positions not exercising significant authority
The President or Secretary of State may appoint any Special Envoy, Special Representative, Special Coordinator, Special Negotiator, Special Envoy, Representative, Coordinator, Special Advisor, or other position performing a similar function, regardless of title, at the Department of State not exercising significant authority pursuant to the laws of the United States without the advice and consent of the Senate, if the President or Secretary, not later than 15 days before the appointment of a person to such a position, submits to the appropriate congressional committees a notification that includes the following:
(A)
A certification that the position does not require the exercise of significant authority pursuant to the laws of the United States.
(B)
A description of the duties and purpose of the position.
(C)
The rationale for giving the specific title and function to the position.
(3)
Limited exception for temporary appointments exercising significant authority
The President may maintain or establish a position with the title of Special Envoy, Special Representative, Special Coordinator, Special Negotiator, Envoy, Representative, Coordinator, Special Advisor, or other position performing a similar function, regardless of title, at the Department of State exercising significant authority pursuant to the laws of the United States for not longer than 180 days if the Secretary of State, not later than 15 days after the appointment of a person to such a position, or 30 days after December 27, 2021, whichever is earlier, submits to the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives a notification that includes the following:
(A)
The necessity for conferring such title and function.
(B)
The dates during which such title and function will be held.
(C)
The justification for not submitting the proposed conferral of such title and function to the Senate as a nomination for advice and consent to appointment.
(D)
All relevant information concerning any potential conflict of interest which the proposed recipient of such title and function may have with regard to the appointment.
(4)
Renewal of temporary appointment
(5)
Exemption
(6)
Effective date
(k)
Qualifications of certain officers of the Department of State
(1)
Officer having primary responsibility for personnel management
(2)
Officer having primary responsibility for diplomatic security
(3)
Officer having primary responsibility for international narcotics and law enforcement
(l)
Office of Sanctions Coordination
(1)
In general
(2)
Head
The head of the Office shall—
(A)
have the rank and status of ambassador;
(B)
be appointed by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate; and
(C)
report directly to the Secretary of State.
(3)
Duties
The head of the Office shall—
(A)
exercise sanctions authorities delegated to the Secretary;
(B)
serve as the principal advisor to the senior management of the Department and the Secretary regarding the development and implementation of sanctions policy;
(C)
serve as the lead representative of the United States in diplomatic engagement on sanctions matters;
(D)
consult and closely coordinate with allies and partners of the United States, including the United Kingdom, the European Union and member countries of the European Union, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, and South Korea, to ensure the maximum effectiveness of sanctions imposed by the United States and such allies and partners;
(E)
serve as the coordinator for the development and implementation of sanctions policy with respect to all activities, policies, and programs of all bureaus and offices of the Department relating to the development and implementation of sanctions policy; and
(F)
serve as the lead representative of the Department in interagency discussions with respect to the development and implementation of sanctions policy.
(4)
Direct hire authority
(A)
In general
(B)
Termination
(m)
Extended post-employment restrictions for certain Senate-confirmed officials
(1)
Definitions
In this subsection:
(A)
Country of concern
The term “country of concern” means—
(i)
the People’s Republic of China;
(ii)
the Russian Federation;
(iii)
the Islamic Republic of Iran;
(iv)
the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea;
(v)
the Republic of Cuba; and
(vi)
the Syrian Arab Republic.
(B)
Foreign government entity
The term “foreign governmental entity” includes—
(i)
any person employed by—
(I)
any department, agency, or other entity of a foreign government at the national, regional, or local level;
(II)
any governing party or coalition of a foreign government at the national, regional, or local level; or
(III)
any entity majority-owned or majority-controlled by a foreign government at the national, regional, or local level; and
(ii)
in the case of a country of concern, any company, economic project, cultural organization, exchange program, or nongovernmental organization that is more than 33 percent owned or controlled by the government of such country.
(C)
Representation
(2)
Secretary of State and Deputy Secretary of State
(3)
Under Secretaries, Assistant Secretaries, and Ambassadors
With respect to a person serving as an Under Secretary, Assistant Secretary, or Ambassador at the Department of State or as the United States Permanent Representative to the United Nations, the restrictions described in section 207(f)(1) of title 18 shall apply to any such person who knowingly represents, aids, or advises—
(A)
a foreign governmental entity before an officer or employee of the executive branch of the United States with the intent to influence a decision of such officer or employee in carrying out his or her official duties for 3 years after the termination of such person’s service in a position described in this paragraph, or the duration of the term or terms of the President who appointed that person to their position, whichever is longer; or
(B)
a foreign governmental entity of a country of concern before an officer or employee of the executive branch of the United States with the intent to influence a decision of such officer or employee in carrying out his or her official duties at any time after the termination of such person’s service in a position described in this paragraph.
(4)
Penalties and injunctions
(5)
Notice of restrictions
Any person subject to the restrictions under this subsection shall be provided notice of these restrictions by the Department of State—
(A)
upon appointment by the President; and
(B)
upon termination of service with the Department of State.
(6)
Effective date
(7)
Sunset
(n)
Chief Artificial Intelligence Officer
(1)
In general
(2)
Duties described
The principal duties and responsibilities of the Chief Artificial Intelligence Officer shall be—
(A)
to evaluate, oversee, and, if appropriate, facilitate the responsible adoption of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning applications to help inform decisions by policymakers and to support programs and management operations of the Department of State; and
(B)
to act as the principal advisor to the Secretary of State on the ethical use of AI and advanced analytics in conducting data-informed diplomacy.
(3)
Qualifications
The Chief Artificial Intelligence Officer should be an individual with demonstrated skill and competency in—
(A)
the use and application of data analytics, AI, and machine learning; and
(B)
transformational leadership and organizational change management, particularly within large, complex organizations.
(4)
Partner with the Chief Information Officer on scaling artificial intelligence use cases
(5)
Artificial intelligence defined
(o)
Special Envoy to the Pacific Islands Forum
(1)
Appointment
(2)
Considerations
(A)
Selection
The Special Envoy shall be—
(i)
a United States Ambassador to a country that is a member of the Pacific Islands Forum; or
(ii)
a qualified individual who is not described in clause (i).
(B)
Limitations
If the President appoints an Ambassador to a country that is a member of the Pacific Islands Forum to serve concurrently as the Special Envoy to the Pacific Islands Forum, such Ambassador—
(i)
may not begin service as the Special Envoy until he or she has been confirmed by the Senate for an ambassadorship to a country that is a member of the Pacific Islands Forum; and
(ii)
shall not receive additional compensation for his or her service as Special Envoy.
(3)
Duties
The Special Envoy shall—
(A)
represent the United States in its role as dialogue partner to the Pacific Islands Forum; and
(B)
carry out such other duties as the President or the Secretary of State may prescribe.
(Aug. 1, 1956, ch. 841, title I, § 1, 70 Stat. 890; renumbered title I and amended Pub. L. 97–241, title II, § 202(a), Aug. 24, 1982, 96 Stat. 282; Pub. L. 103–236, title I, § 161(a), Apr. 30, 1994, 108 Stat. 402; Pub. L. 103–415, § 1(f)(1), Oct. 25, 1994, 108 Stat. 4299; Pub. L. 105–277, div. G, subdiv. A, title XII, § 1213, title XIII, § 1313, subdiv. B, title XXIII, §§ 2301(a), 2303–2305(a)(1), (b)(1), (c), 2306, Oct. 21, 1998, 112 Stat. 2681–767, 2681–776, 2681–824, 2681–825, 2681–826; Pub. L. 106–553, § 1(a)(2) [title IV, § 404(a)], Dec. 21, 2000, 114 Stat. 2762, 2762A–96; Pub. L. 107–228, div. A, title III, § 303, Sept. 30, 2002, 116 Stat. 1377; Pub. L. 108–25, title I, § 102(a), May 27, 2003, 117 Stat. 721; Pub. L. 108–458, title VII, § 7109(b)(1), Dec. 17, 2004, 118 Stat. 3793; Pub. L. 110–293, title I, § 102, July 30, 2008, 122 Stat. 2933; Pub. L. 112–166, § 2(j), Aug. 10, 2012, 126 Stat. 1286; Pub. L. 116–94, div. J, title VII, § 703, Dec. 20, 2019, 133 Stat. 3070; Pub. L. 116–260, div. FF, title III, § 361(a)(1), (2), Dec. 27, 2020, 134 Stat. 3131, 3132; Pub. L. 117–81, div. E, title LI, §§ 5102(a), 5103, 5105, Dec. 27, 2021, 135 Stat. 2343, 2345, 2346; Pub. L. 117–263, div. I, title XCI, § 9107(a), title XCII, § 9215(b), title XCV, § 9502(a), title XCVI, § 9602(a), Dec. 23, 2022, 136 Stat. 3859, 3876, 3898, 3910; Pub. L. 118–31, div. F, title LXIII, § 6303, title LXIV, § 6405(b), Dec. 22, 2023, 137 Stat. 986, 998.)
cite as: 22 USC 2651a