Amendments

1997—Subsec. (a). Pub. L. 105–119, which directed the amendment of section 401 of title 22, United States Code, by inserting “The Secretary of Commerce may seize and detain any commodity (other than arms or munitions of war) or technology which is intended to be or is being exported in violation of laws governing such exports and may seize and detain any vessel, vehicle, or aircraft containing the same or which has been used or is being used in exporting or attempting to export such articles.” after first sentence in subsec. (a), was executed by making the insertion in section 1(a) of act June 15, 1917, ch. 30, which is classified to this section, to reflect the probable intent of Congress.

Subsec. (b). Pub. L. 105–119, which directed the amendment of section 401 of title 22, United States Code, by inserting “However, with respect to seizures and forfeitures of property under this section by the Secretary of Commerce, such duties as are imposed upon the customs officer or any other person with respect to the seizure and forfeiture of property under the customs law may be performed by such officers as are designated by the Secretary of Commerce or, upon the request of the Secretary of Commerce, by any other agency that has authority to manage and dispose of seized property.” after “and not inconsistent with the provisions hereof.” in subsec. (b), was executed by making the insertion in section 1(b) of act June 15, 1917, ch. 30, which is classified to this section, to reflect the probable intent of Congress.

1953—Act Aug. 13, 1953, provided not only seizure and forfeiture of articles or merchandise which are being, or are intended to be illegally exported, and the vehicle, vessel, or aircraft in which exportation is intended to accomplish, but also for the seizure and forfeiture of articles or merchandise actually illegally exported out, the carrier used to effectuate the exportation, provided for applicability of laws relating to seizure, summary and judicial forfeiture and condemnation, and provided for the disposition of seized materials.

1930—Act June 17, 1930, substituted “comptrollers of customs” for “Naval officers of customs”.

Ex. Ord. No. 10863. Authorization of Attorney General To Seize Arms and Munitions of War, and Other Articles

Ex. Ord. No. 10863, Feb. 18, 1960, 25 F.R. 1507, provided:

By virtue of the authority vested in me by section 1 of Title VI of the act of June 15, 1917, 40 Stat. 223, as amended by section 1 of the act of August 13, 1953, 67 Stat. 577 (22 U.S.C. 401), it is ordered as follows:

Section 1. The Attorney General is hereby designated under section 1 of Title VI of the act of June 15, 1917, as amended by section 1 of the act of August 13, 1953 [this section], as a person duly authorized to seize and detain arms or munitions of war or other articles, and to seize and detain any vessel, vehicle, or aircraft containing such items or which has been, or is being, used in exporting or attempting to export such arms or munitions of war or other articles, whenever an attempt is made to export or ship from or take out of the United States such arms or munitions of war or other articles in violation of law, or whenever it is known, or there is probable cause to believe, that such arms or munitions of war or other articles are intended to be, or are being or have been, exported or removed from the United States in violation of law.

Sec. 2. The authority conferred upon the Attorney General by section 1 of this order may be exercised by any officer of the Department of Justice designated for such purpose by the Attorney General.

Dwight D. Eisenhower.